claudia ficca + davide luciano: potholes


'potholes' by claudia ficca, davide luciano
all images courtesy claudia ficca, davide luciano
(above) 'baywatch' on almafi drive, los angeles
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'potholes' by canadian creatives claudia ficca and davide luciano is a series of photographs
depicting the concave cracks as functional tools in a collection of imaginative tableus in the city.
captured within the backdrop of los angeles, montreal, and new york city, the set explores the urban
flaw as a playground, creating a multitude of uses out of them including a swimming pool, an oil tank
to fry doughnuts, a bath for pedicures, a giant plate of spaghetti, and more.

directly engaging with the street and the city, the highly imaginative series transforms the bad into good,
creating a tongue-in-cheek collection of tableus that are at once contextual and surreal. taking no more
than 10 minutes from start to finish, the photoshoots are done during uninterrupted traffic where there
is a suitable - and sizeable - pothole.



'alice in wonderland' on 30th street, new york city
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'fisherman' on henri-julien, montreal
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'diver' on avenue musset, montreal
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'gardener' on cote du vesinet, montreal
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'winemaking' on rue st.zotique, montreal
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'spaghetti & meatballs' on greenwich street, new york city
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'dog wash' on alfred street, los angeles
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'doughnuts' on rue belanger, montreal
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'beer & BBQ' on rue waverly, montreal
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'champagne' on tecumseth street, toronto
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'scuba diver' on avenue beaconsfield, montreal
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'laundry' on rue st.urbain, montreal
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'pedicure' on rue queen, montreal
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'baptism' on chemin de la foret, montreal
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'bubble bath' on rue de st.firmin, montreal
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'walk of fame' on new hampshire, los angeles
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano



'santa claus' on tremaine street, los angeles
image © claudia ficca, davide luciano

courtesy:DB

Fire Drawings


'approaching storm' by paul chojnowski
burned and scorched paper (30 x 40 inches)



american artist paul chojnowski works with fire and water on paper and wood, creating photograph-like and narrative
images by selectively burning and charring the surface.

chojnowski developed his unconventional technique in the early 1990's, while working with wax and raw pigments
on wooden panels. discovering that he could burn marks into the wood's surface using handheld torches, chojnowski
began creating 'fire drawings', first on wood and then also on paper.

his current technique involves the use first of a water dropper, which he uses to soak each part of a sheet of watercolour paper
to a different level of wetness. taking a torch to the surface, he then burns the image; the wettest areas of the piece are the slowest
to burn, and thus remain lighter in tone even as the driest sections char to black. control is critical in the process, as even a moment
of overheating can cause the entire work to burst into flame.

chojnowski also uses the natural textures of his surfaces as a layer of detail; for example, in his 'evening of the deluge'
and 'after the deluge' prints, burned and highlighted regions align carefully against the grain of the wood, offering the impression
of water ripples.



'search lights', burned and scorched baltic birch plywood (40 x 60 inches)



'after the deluge', burned and scorched paper (30 x 40 inches)



'beacon', burned and scorched baltic birch plywood (48 x 36 inches)



'candere 1', burned and scorched paper (22 x 15 inches)



'evening rain', burned and scorched paper



'ribbons and ring'



'times square 11:20pm', burned and scorched paper (30 x 22 inches)

Optical delusions and small realities


otherworldly: optical delusions and small realities
museum of arts and design, new york
on now until september 18, 2011



miniature work by lori nix
'beauty shop' (in progress), 2010
c-print
40 x 52 inches
courtesy of the artist; clampart gallery, new york



'otherworldly: optical delusions and small realities' presents a series of 37 miniature worlds, transporting visitors into surreal,
hyperrealistic worlds, secretive environments, challenging one's perception of what is real and what is fabricated.

the featured artists explore the use of the diorama as a contemporary art form through site-specific installation, video, photography,
(even snow globes...), creating dioramas as free-standing sculptures, while also using them as subjects for photographs or animated videos.
each tiny built world is realized through an intense engagement with a diverse set of materials and a meticulous attention to detail
allowing for the production of elaborate environments that are at once familiar and foreign.



miniature work by lori nix
'great hall', 2006
courtesy of the artist



'otherworldly ...', held at the museum of art and design (MAD) in new york, is loosely organized around four themes,
providing a narrative thread for the diverse subject matters at hand:
'apocalyptic archaeology' introduces viewers to architectural monuments and interiors, frequently in ruin, as a means of investigating
the ultimate deterioration and decay of cultural artifacts. 'unnatural nature' is an ironic look at our fascination with simulating
natural phenomena. works pertaining to 'dreams and memories' question the nature and meaning of recalled experiences.
finally, 'voyeur / provocateurs' delves into hidden, secretive spaces and unspoken narratives.
the exhibition excludes dollhouses, theatrical sets, maquettes and architectural models.



miniature work by alan wolfson
'canal st. cross-section', 2009-10
27 x 23.5 x 19.5 inches

courtesy of the artist


the international artists represented are each dedicated to a practice that focuses on traditional low-tech and hand-made processes.
photographs in the exhibition are created using traditional equipment and not digitally manipulated, constructing small locales,
both mythic and actual, becoming the subjects of their photographic investigations. for many of the photographers represented,
this exhibition is the first occasion in which their built models are displayed to the public, focusing specifically on dioramas
and installations as works of art.



miniature work by alan wolfson
'canal st. cross-section' (in progress, detail), 2009-10
mixed media
27 x 23.5 x 19.5 inches
courtesy of the artist; private collection, england
see designboom's article on alan wolfson's canal st. cross-section.



miniature work by joe fig
'chuck close: 8/1/04 - 4/25/06', 2005-06
mixed media
11 x 11 x 9.5 inches
courtesy of the artist



'in a social and artistic environment in which digital programming and cyberworlds are embedded in almost every aspect
of our day-to-day activity, these artists are taking the bold step to reengage with the tangible and going back to the roots
of artistic practice. they are creating magical worlds that, whether depicting floating landscapes, haunting interiors,
or abandoned rooms, are all about place, emotion, memory, and vision - both perceived and created,
'
says MAD's chief curator david mcfadden



miniature work by joe fig
'jackson pollock', 2008 (detail)
wood, polymer clay, canvas, pencil, oil / acrylic paint, metal, plastic
8 x 21 x 17.5 inches
courtesy of the arts; private collection




miniature work by patrick jacobs
work in progress, 2008
courtesy of the artist



exhibiting artists include:
matthew albanese, rick araluce, mat collishaw, thomas doyle, gregory euclide, joe fig, frank kunert, walter martin, charles matton,
didier massard, paloma muñoz, lori nix, david opdyke and charles simonds.

Color Tip by Caroline Jasper .

Caroline Jasper's Color Tip: Value is worth a lot!

















Value is a significant color characteristic. Contrasts between darks and lights are key to visual impact. Through comparison of such differences our brains perceive objects and determine depth. Lighter things stand out against dark backgrounds. Dark ones show up better against light. Strong darks and lights together read as close; lack of value contrast reads as distant. Working strictly in black and white, without the distraction of color, it is easier to represent form and lighting. Since we do not live in a black and white world, painters must become aware of value differences among colors both in the subject and on the palette. Painting value studies prior to working in color helps to identify important darks and lights throughout a color reference. Test your color-value acuity. Take a black and white digital shot of your color work or convert a color image to grayscale in a computer photo application. If the image holds up well in black and white, it will present boldly in color.
----
Paintings Light Watch and Bask are both oils by Caroline Jasper.
Courtesy Creative catalyst

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